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Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note

Florence Jacobowitz & Richard Lippe   |   May 2020

This issue is devoted to the cinema and its relationship to history.  We were inspired by a number of recent films, for example Pawlikowski’s Cold War, and Petzold’s Transit, directors whose oeuvres are largely devoted to exploring post WW2 history from various perspectives, insisting on its continuing relevance to the contemporary world.  These directors meld personal history, social history and cinematic history in the way directors such as Truffaut and Godard did, initiating the New Wave, a movement that recognized the significance of all of these aspects in their films. Scorsese’s The Irishman is an example of a film that combines postwar history of America, the personal history of its auteur and an appreciation of the cinema, its evolution and conventions. Scorsese also makes a statement about the loss of a historical consciousness and how that affects one’s identity.  These films are a testament to the cinema as an art form essential to life and human experience.

This issue includes articles that reference history, film history and celebrates Cineaction and its identity as a magazine of criticism that is now celebrating its 100th issue since its inception in 1985. 

Florence Jacobowitz & Richard Lippe

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